Doggie Bag Do’s and Don’ts

learn the do's and don't of doggie bags with Catch Dog Trainers

This may be a “slice of heaven” going down, but once eaten, it could cause health troubles.
Image source: www.thisblogrules.com

Every dog owner loves to gift their pet with a special treat because it shows appreciation and love for the adoration and joy they give us.  But did you know that your leftovers from dinner out could be harmful and even fatal to your cherished pup?

Here are two reasons why doggie bags are not for dogs.

Leftover bones

Don’t feed your dog chicken bones!  You probably heard this since childhood and the reason is: cooked chicken bones will splinter and can harm your dog.  This is true for all cooked bones: chicken, beef or pork.  It’s true that your puppy will salivate and gnaw on a large bone, especially if it has pieces of meat stuck to it.  What’s the harm in that?

A cooked bone, though rich in calcium and phosphorous, becomes brittle.  The bone will eventually break and splinter as the dog chews on it.  Splinters have the potential to puncture and tear the digestive tract.  Should this happen, your cherished pet can become septic and possibly develop a fatal illness.

Raw bones do not splinter but proceed with caution and do your research if you go this route.  There is a chance of food poisoning due to bacteria.

Human food

Chances are someone in the family slips the dog a “treat” from the table.  In small portions, this may not harm your dog but it would be in their best interest to leave the human food to humans.

Alliums are bulbous plants that are often used in recipes: onions, garlic, leeks and chives.  When ingested by your dog, these ingredients destroy red blood cells and may cause toxic anemia.  Xylitol is a sugar substitute often found in many foods.  If your pet eats foods with too much of this, it may cause a drop in blood sugar, which may cause depression, loss of motor function, seizures, and possibly death.  Too much salt can cause kidney failure and too much fat may cause pancreatitis.

We may feel good about “breaking bread” with our pets.  There is something comfortable and social about sharing a meal, however, routinely giving your dog leftovers might be doing harm to your dog and the vet bills will eventually harm your wallet.

Remember: Dog food is specially formulated for the canine metabolism and health.  Human food and leftover bones are not critical to their diet, but it could put them in critical care.  When in doubt – refrain, but if you still have questions, contact your local veterinarian.

Do's and Don'ts of feeding your dog human food

Small and large breeds alike can be harmed by being over weight. It puts undue pressure on their joints and makes it harder for them to get healthy exercise.
Image source: Flickr.com

Citations

1-800-PetMeds.  Feeding Bones to your Dog.  http://www.1800petmeds.com/education/are-bones-safe-for-dogs-4.htm

About.com.  8 Foods that are Toxic to Pets.  http://vetmedicine.about.com/od/toxicology/a/Top-8-Pet-Picnic-Poisons.htm

PetMD.  Holiday Leftovers for your Pets?  http://www.petmd.com/dog/wellness/nutrition/evr_multi_holiday_scraps2

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Phone: 877-752-2824